Posts tagged 'linkeddata'


Thursday Feb 09, 2012

HTML5 Microdata and Schema.org

Worth a read and related to my Web Integration Patterns post on Embedded Properties in HTML:

HTML5 Microdata and Schema.org:HTML5 Microdata and Schema.org On June 2, 2011, Bing, Google, and Yahoo! announced the joint effort Schema.org. When the big search engines talk, Web site authors listen. This article is an introduction to Microdata and Schema.org. The first section describes what HTML5, Microdata and Schema.org are, and the problems they have been designed to solve. With this foundation in place section 2 provides a practical tutorial of how to use Microdata and Schema.org using a real life example from the cultural heritage sector. Along the way some tools for implementers will also be introduced. Issues with applying these technologies to cultural heritage materials will crop up along with opportunities to improve the situation.

Wednesday Jun 01, 2011

OSLC Core v2 specification now FINAL

I've been working on the OSLC Core specification for about 1.5 years now as workgroup lead, and OSLC fits squarely under the "open web technologies" and Web Integration Patterns topics of this blog, so I'm blogging this happy news.

Here's the announcement From the OSLC Core Workgroup mailing list:

From: Dave Johnson
To: oslc-core (a) open-services.net, community (a) open-services.net
Subject: OSLC Core v2 specification now FINAL

Today [1], I'm very happy to announce that the OSLC Core v2
specification is FINAL.

The OSLC Core v2 specification [2] defines a set of REST and Linked
Data-based patterns, resources and protocols for integration of application 
and product lifecycle resources (ALM and PLM). It's designed to be the
foundation for all other OSLC domain specifications and there are now
three final OSLC specifications that are based on the Core, those
being the OSLC Change Management (CM) [3], OSLC Quality Management
(QM) [4] and OSLC Requirements Management (RM) [5] specs.

I'd like to thank all of the members of the OSLC Core Workgroup and
community for their hard work, critical thinking and ability to work
together in such a productive and pleasant way. Also, special thanks
to those OSLC domain workgroups who rebased their work on the Core and
development teams that provided excellent feedback along the way.

Thanks,
- Dave

--
David M. Johnson
OSLC Core Workgroup Lead
IBM Rational Software


[1] Move to final was proposed last week, along with a small set of
changes which have since been applied to the specification. 
[2] OslcCoreSpecification
[3] CmSpecificationV2
[4] QmSpecificationV2
[5] RmSpecificationV2

I really do have another Web Integration Patterns post on the way shortly, so stay tuned.

Monday Mar 21, 2011

WIP: Links

This is the first in my series of Web Integration Patterns. Check out the intro at this URL http://rollerweblogger.org/roller/entry/web_integration_patterns

Synopsis

Use links as a way to integrate web sites & applications via navigation and relationships between resources.

[Read More]

Friday Dec 03, 2010

re: RDF and OpenSocial

This is the closest thing to a blog post that I've written lately, a post to the OpenSocial specification group on aligning OpenSocial with RDF and Linked Data:

This is a topic of interest to me, so I'll try to elaborate.

First, I want to point out that RDF is not a representation, it's a way to model data and it's multiple ways to represent that data (in XML, JSON, etc.). I think the real question is: how do we enable OpenSocial to hook into the RDF-based web of "Linked Data" that is rapidly growing up around scientific data, government open data and the academic world. I'm not going to go into the benefits of Linked Data in this post, but I will disclose that I work for a company that uses RDF as a common data model to enable loosely coupled integration across our web application products (see also Jazz Integration Architecture [1] and OSLC [2]). We'd like to be able to integrate with OpenSocial services in the same ways.

I'll explain the basics of RDF. RDF is way to model web data and ways to represent that data in XML, JSON, Turtle, etc. The RDF data model is simple, we have resources identified by URIs and property values associated with those resources. Resources can have types, each type is identified by a URI. Property types have URIs too. Once you have defined your data model in terms of RDF types and properties, you can represent resources and their properties using RDF representations. There's RDF/XML for XML, there's RDFa for embedding properties in HTML. There's are JSON representations too, but not a standard for JSON yet.

So, to bring OpenSocial in-line with the world of Linked Data, we would define each class of OpenSocial objects as an RDF type, with a URI. We would define each OpenSocial property as an RDF property, with a URI. In some cases, we'll want to use existing properties, like the Dublin Core title, name, etc., and in some cases we'll want to define entirely new types and properties.

As a starting point, I think we would do the following:

* In OpenSocial v2, we would define all OpenSocial objects and properties as RDF types in the OpenSocial Specs. This means simply assigning a URI to every class and every property we define, using standard properties where appropriate and defining new ones as needed. Object and property names would rename the same and we'd have what is essentially an RDF mapping built into the spec. Existing OpenSocial representation formats would stay the same, but we'd add some new RDF representations.

* We'd introduce an optional new OpenSocial spec that services MAY implement: the OpenSocial RDF Specification. The specification would simply require that a service provide RDF representations of it's resources via content-negotiation. The service could offer RDF/XML or HTML with RDFa, JSON/RDF or all of the above.

That's a starting point and I think we could come up with some other ideas if we thought more about use cases. Anybody else interested in aligning the worlds of OpenSocial and Linked Data?

Link: RDF and OpenSocial